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 Mark of the Beast

 Revelation 13:11 And I beheld another beast coming up out of the earth; and he had two horns like a lamb, and he spake as a dragon. 13:12 And he exerciseth all the power of the first beast before him, and causeth the earth and them which dwell therein to worship the first beast, whose deadly wound was healed. 13:13 And he doeth great wonders, so that he maketh fire come down from heaven on the earth in the sight of men, 13:14 And deceiveth them that dwell on the earth by the means of those miracles which he had power to do in the sight of the beast; saying to them that dwell on the earth, that they should make an image to the beast, which had the wound by a sword, and did live. 13:15 And he had power to give life unto the image of the beast, that the image of the beast should both speak, and cause that as many as would not worship the image of the beast should be killed. 13:16 And he causeth all, both small and great, rich and poor, free and bond, to receive a mark in their right hand, or in their foreheads: 13:17 And that no man might buy or sell, save he that had the mark, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name. 13:18 Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six (666).

Now, I ask you, does that sound like a conspiracy theory to you? 

What it does sound like is the Vice-President of the United States telling the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court that "one day you will rule on implantable chips in human beings". Wow...take a moment, let it sink in. And that's how it goes with most conspiracy theories, they have a very strong basis in reality. And yes, there is a government plan to put a chip in your body, and you need to decide if this is a good thing or a bad thing. Just how strong is the push to bring this technology to the people?


 

Homeland Security to test BOSS facial recognition at junior hockey game 

facial-recognition2 

By Rawlson King   

September 20, 2013 -  

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security will test its crowd-scanning facial recognition system, known as the Biometric Optical Surveillance System, or BOSS, at a junior hockey game this weekend, according to the Russian news agency RT. 

facial-recognitionWith assistance from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, DHS will test its system at a Western Hockey League game in Washington state. The test will determine whether the system can distinguish the faces of 20 volunteers out of a crowd of nearly 6,000 hockey fans, to evaluate how successfully BOSS can locate a person of interest. 

According to DHS, BOSS technology consists of two cameras capable of taking stereoscopic images of a face and a back end remote matching system. Stereoscopic images are two images of the same object, taken at slightly different angles that create an illusion of three-dimensional depth from two-dimensional images. 

The cameras transfer the pair of images to the remote matching system by way of fiber optic or wireless technology. The system then processes and stores the two images into a 3-D signature, which is the mathematical representation of the stereo-pair images that the system uses for matching. 

Using the BOSS facial recognition algorithms, the signature is matched against a locally stored database created from volunteers, using a combination of mathematical and statistical analysis. 

BOSS is capable of capturing images of an individual at 50-100 meters in distance. The system can capture images of subjects participating from a specific distance, or be set up in a way that tracks and passively captures frontal face images of an individual as he/she moves in front of the camera. 

As reported previously in BiometricUpdate.com, a $5.2 million contract for BOSS was awarded to Electronic Warfare Associates, a U.S. military contractor. 

Recently the system was not deemed ready since it could not achieve 80 to 90 percent identification accuracy at a distance of 100 meters and could not process and identify images in less than 30 seconds against a biometric database. 

This weekend’s test will attempt to rectify this deficiency.  If the test succeeds, the technology conceivably could be used at international crossings and other ports across the United States patrolled by the department.


Wave of their Hand over a Palm Scanner

11:32PM EST November 25. 2012 - At schools in Pinellas County, Fla., students aren't paying for lunch with cash or a card, but with a wave of their hand over a palm scanner.

"It's so quick that a child could be standing in line, call mom and say, 'I forgot my lunch money today.' She's by her computer, runs her card, and by the time the child is at the front of the line, it's already recorded," says Art Dunham, director of food services for Pinellas County Schools.

Students take about four seconds to swipe and pay for lunch, Dunham says, and they're doing it with 99% accuracy.

"We just love it. No one wants to go back," Dunham says.

Palm-scanning technology is popping up nationwide as a bona fide biometric tracker of identities, and it appears poised to make the jump from schools and hospitals to other sectors of the economy including ATM usage and retail. It also has applications as a secure identifier for cloud computing.

Here's how it works: Using the same near-infrared technology that comes in a TV remote control or Nintendo Wii video game, the device takes a super high-resolution infrared photograph of the vein pattern just below a person's skin. That image, between 1.5 and 2.5 square inches, is recorded and digitized.

The PalmSecure device is made by document-scanning manufacturer Fujitsu. So far, no other company has a palm scanner on the market — though at least one other company is working on the technology.

Like many technological breakthroughs, the development began accidentally. A decade ago, a Fujitsu engineer in Tokyo mistakenly ran his hand over a page scanner and it yielded an output that piqued his curiosity. Testing eventually showed that the veins in the palm of your hand are as unique as a fingerprint and can be photographed under infrared light.

Fujitsu has seen double-digit quarterly sales growth in each of the last two years, says Bud Yanak, director of product management and partner development for Fujitsu Frontech North America.

Palm scanners are installed in more than 50 school systems and more than 160 hospital systems in 15 states and the District of Columbia, Yanak says.

Pinellas County Schools were the first in the nation to bring palm scanning to their lunch lines about 18 months ago. They are being used by 50,000 students at 17 high schools and 20 middle schools. Soon, the program will expand to 60,000 more students at 80 elementary schools, Dunham says. The 2% of students who opt out can still use cash.

He says hygiene isn't a concern because students don't need to touch the device, but only hold their hand directly above it, to register a scan.

At hospitals, the scans are making patient registration more efficient, and prevent sharing of information by patients that could lead to insurance fraud, says Carl Bertrams, senior vice president of sales and marketing for palm scan software maker HT Systems in Tampa.

 

Cranberry Station cafeteria manager Peggy Vincent runs the computer that links the scan to a student's account.(Photo: Jack Gruber, USA TODAY)

A palm scan's precision record-keeping also avoids possible confusion if patients have the same name. For instance, a hospital system in the Houston area with a database of 3.5 million patients has 2,488 women in it named Maria Garcia – and 231 of them have the same date of birth, Bertrams says.

HT Systems president David Wiener won't reveal revenue but says that since 2007, they've got more than 160 hospitals for clients and have scanned more than 5 million patients.

At Wisconsin's UW Health system, palm scans have been used for about two years, says Dawn Gramse, a senior systems analyst. Soon, they'll start using self-service palm-swiping kiosks for patients to check themselves in.

"You'd hear about other biometric scanners that are out there, and you'd see the Mission Impossible movies with the eye scanners, and you'd never think you can integrate that kind of technology into a hospital," she says, "but you can."

Not everyone loves the idea of scans.

Students in Carroll County, Md., schools are using lunch line palm scanners, but 7-year-old Ian Webb isn't one of them. His father, Michael Webb, decided to have Ian, a second-grader, opt out of the program at Piney Ridge Elementary in Eldersburg.

"My son is not using the technology," he says. "I'll be honest, I think it's horrible. It's an intrusion into our children's rights."

Webb says he's concerned that use of the scanners by elementary school students normalizes the use of biometrics and anesthetizes young children to recognizing privacy violations later in life.

"I understand taking an iris scan of a pilot at an airport, so you know it's the right pilot flying the plane" he says. "This is that level of equipment they're installing in a line that serves steamed corn. I don't think it rises to the level of steamed corn."

Chris Calabrese, legislative counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union in Washington, says the key to this particular kind of biometrics — that is, the kind a user consents to, unlike some facial recognition software — is ensuring that all data be treated sensitively.

"If it's a technology that works really well, it won't be long before you're offering your palm in a lot of different locations, and you will be concerned about whose got access to that information and what they want to do with it," Calabrese says.

The technology is expanding. Fujitsu in September launched a new line of palm-scanning ATMs in Japan, according to a company news release. Customers of Ogaki Kyoritsu Bank now can access cash machines without a bank card or personal identification number.

And while Fujitsu says it's the only company with such a product on the market right now, computer company Intel Corp. is working with palm-scanning technology.

Palm scanning can be used as a substitute for clunky, hard-to-remember passwords, says Sridhar Iyengar, director of security research at Intel Labs.

"There is a way around it, and biometrics is one option," Iyengar. "Replacing what you know — passwords — with what you are ... it's an ease of use issue. It's harder to spoof, and you're not likely to forget your fingerprints anytime soon."

 

 

PayPal launches secure facial recognition Check In payment service

 

PayPal has launched its new Check In mobile payment service in London Richmond, listing it as a key area in its ongoing bid to increase UK wireless transaction levels.

The Check In service will initially launch in 12 Richmond high street premises including cafes, restaurants, shops, a hotel and a fish and chip shop. The service is available via iOS, Android and Windows Phone apps. It works in a similar way to Visa's V.me digital wallet, but adds additional facial recognition security and store-tracking features.

When activated the app highlights nearby shops and restaurants that accept PayPal payments. It then asks the the user to check in to the shop by clicking on its icon. Once checked in, the user's name and photo appears on the shop's payment system, letting the cashier check the person making the payment is the account's owner.

PayPal head of retail services Rob Harper listed Check In as a key step in the company's ongoing bid to boost mobile payments levels in the UK.

"PayPal first brought ‘pay by mobile' to the UK high street two years ago. Through our Richmond initiative, we're pleased to help local businesses of all sizes offer a new more personal experience, while never having to turn away customers who don't have enough cash on them to pay. Now locals in Richmond can leave their wallet or purse at home and be the first in the country to use their profile picture to pay," he said.

"This is another step on the journey towards a walletless high street, where customers will be able to leave their wallet or purse at home and pay using their phone or tablet. We predict that by 2016 this will become a reality. Our Richmond initiative shows that innovation is alive and well on the British high street."

Check In's added security features are also expected to be a key seller for the service. Mobile and wireless payments security protocols have been an ongoing concern for British end users. Most recently Visa issued a statement promising that mobile payments are just as secure as their chip and pin equivalents.

 

They will use any and every excuse to sell it to us. 

Chipping kids to prevent kidnappings, chipping the elderly to guard against Alzheimer's, chipping diabetics, chipping people with allergies, chipping people to prevent medical mistakes...and the list goes on and on. It all sounds good, it all sounds so right - using technology to better our lives. But it's not good, and it's not right. What it is, is the Mark of the Beast as foretold by God.

 

Mark of the beast in vending machines:
Vending machines that use fingerprint and retinal scans to sell you chips

"MYFOXNY.COM - Your thumbprint might soon be the key to an afternoon candy bar. A Massachusetts based vending machine company is joining the growing ranks of companies that are field-testing new technologies. Next Generation Vending and Food Service is experimenting with biometric vending machines that would allow a user to tie a credit card to their thumbprint. "For a certain demographic that is pretty cool," says company president John S. Ioannou. Next Generation is currently testing about 60 of the biometric machines in various locations in the northeast.

The company is also testing other technologies. Ioannou says the key to the transforming the vending machine business is making the consumer feel more engaged. The days might be numbered where a consumer watches a bag of chips roll through the machine and drop. Next Generation is also testing a machine that includes a 46" touch-screen display that acts similarly to an iPhone display. The user can click on an item, flip the image and even see the nutrional information on the back of the packaging. Ioannou says initial results are good saying, "The feedback is extraordinary." The machines include internally mounted cameras to monitor what is going on outside of the machine. The company is also installing wireless or Ethernet connections on all of its current machines so there will be real-time reporting of the amount of goods in the machine for restocking purposes. Monitors will even be able to report when a coin is stuck in the machine. All of the current machines will be upgraded by the end of 2011.

 


 

You Are Chipped Already

If an economic system was introduced which the RFID chip was part of the system, well odds are you are already taking part of that system.

Here are some examples…

 

http://www.prophezine.com/index.php?option=com_content&id=674:obamacare-and-the-mark-of-the-beast





 

MIT Student Turns His Body Into a Computer

 

Mit Student.jpgThe tech world has been buzzing for the past week over an MIT Media Lab student project which converts any surface - including the human body - into a touchpad that controls a mobile computer in your pocket. Using just $350 of off-the-shelf technology, Pranav Mistry created the device for the Fluid Interfaces group at the Media Lab.

According to Wired's Kim Zetter, who reported on the device from entertainment technology conference TED:

The prototype was built from an ordinary webcam and a battery-powered 3M projector, with an attached mirror — all connected to an internet-enabled mobile phone. The setup, which costs less than $350, allows the user to project information from the phone onto any surface — walls, the body of another person or even your hand . . . The gestures can be as simple as using his fingers and thumbs to create a picture frame that tells the camera to snap a photo, which is saved to his mobile phone. When he gets back to an office, he projects the images onto a wall and begins to size them. When he encounters someone at a party, the system projects a cloud of words on the person's body to provide more information about him — his blog URL, the name of his company, his likes and interests.

Mistry and his colleagues have patented the device, which they believe will integrate nicely into next-generation mobiles that come equipped with projectors. I love the idea of dialing a phone from my hand, or taking pictures with finger gestures.

Read more about the project at Wired.

 




 

Mark of the beast in your smart phone:
Apple's plan to track your every move.

As one of the world's most successful innovator and creator of cutting-edge technology that millions of people adopt the second it's released, paying close attention to what they do is very important. So here are some of the new features being planned in future releases fof their products, particularly for the iPhone.

 




  • A system that can take a picture of the user's face, "without a flash, any noise, or any indication that a picture is being taken to prevent the current user from knowing he is being photographed";
  • The system can record the user's voice, whether or not a phone call is even being made;
  • The system can determine the user's unique individual heartbeat "signature";
  • To determine if the device has been hacked, the device can watch for "a sudden increase in memory usage of the electronic device";
  • The user's "Internet activity can be monitored or any communication packets that are served to the electronic device can be recorded"; and
  • The device can take a photograph of the surrounding location to determine where it is being used.

In other words, Apple will know who you are, where you are, and what you are doing and saying and even how fast your heart is beating. In some embodiments of Apple's "invention," this information "can be gathered every time the electronic device is turned on, unlocked, or used." When an "unauthorized use" is detected, Apple can contact a "responsible party." A "responsible party" may be the device's owner, it may also be "proper authorities or the police." source - EFF.org



 

Mark of the beast in your money:
420 banks demand 1-world currency

"The Institute of International Finance, a group that represents 420 of the world's largest banks and finance houses, has issued yet another call for a one-world global currency, Jerome Corsi's Red Alert reports. "A core group of the world's leading economies need to come together and hammer out an understanding," Charles Dallara, the Institute of International Finance's managing director, told the Financial Times. An IIF policy letter authored by Dallara and dated Oct. 4 made clear that global currency coordination was needed, in the group's view, to prevent a looming currency war.The narrowly focused unilateral and bilateral policy actions seen in recent months - including many proposed and actual measures on trade, currency intervention and monetary policy - have contributed to worsening underlying macroeconomic imbalances," Dallara wrote. "They have also led to growing protectionist pressures as countries scramble for export markets as a source of growth." Dallard encouraged a return to the G-20 commitment to utilize International Monetary Fund special drawing rights to create an international one-world currency alternative to the U.S. dollar as a new standard of foreign-exchange reserves.

 

Rabbi Kaduri